Holocaust Memorial Day, 27 January

For Holocaust Memorial Day this year, some UK religious news services are drawing welcome attention to the reminder by a British rabbi that the promise of “never again” has simply not been kept. Quite correctly, he points out that we have seen many genocides in many parts of the world since WWII.

After the Nazi slaughter of six million Jews during World War II, the world cried out “never again.” But one of Britain’s best-known young rabbis, Jonathan Romain, of Maidenhead Synagogue in Berkshire, said that although it was a wonderful phrase, “never again” has proved tragically wrong.

“Genocide has happened again and again and again,” he said in an interview with ENInews ahead of Holocaust Memorial Day, 27 January. The United Nations declared it an international event in November 2005.

“We only have to think about Biafra, Bosnia, Darfur and there are other examples,” said Romain, who is often a spokesman for Reform Judaism in the United Kingdom. “The list is deeply depressing and screams out that Holocaust Memorial Day is needed as much now as ever before.”

The Holocaust continues to have a lasting effect, through to the second, third and fourth generations of Jews, said Godfrey Fischer, senior warden of Thanet and District Reform Synagogue in Kent where services involving hundreds of schoolchildren will be held on 27 January.

“But it’s not just the Jewish community that has been affected,” Fischer said in an interview. “You also have to think about the relatives of Germans who were adults during the war, who have discovered what terrible things their parents or grandparents did.”

 

However, it is not only the genocides since WWII we need to remember, it is also the parallel holocausts that occurred during the war, alongside that of the Jews- of gypsies, for example, and of homosexuals.

He goes on to say that we must remember the untold stories. So we must – and one of the forgotten stories that we need to remember is that of the Chuch’s active persecution of “sodomites”, including burning at the stake many thousands of people during the Renaissance – while some popes, cardinals and bishops were themselves enjoying sexual relationships with men, protecting relatives who did, or spending large sums commissioning homoerotic art.

I reproduce below a post I originally published last year (for Ash Wednesday, but which is equally relevant for Holocaust Memorial Day):

Lest We Forget: The Ashes of our Martyrs

For Ash Wednesday, I reminded readers here that the season of Lent is also a “joyful” season, an aspect that should not be ignored.  We should never forget though, that it is also a solemn time, above all a time for repentance and renewal, individually and collectively.

So it was entirely appropriate and welcome ten years ago, that at the start of the season Pope John Paul spoke of the horrors that had been perpetrated by the church in the past, apologised for the evils it had done to .    and asked for forgiveness. This was important and welcome:  I do not wish to belittle it in any way.  However, there is an important category of offence which was omitted from the list, for which he did not apologise, and for which there has never been any apology: the persecution of “sodomites”.

For the first thousand years of its history, the Church was disapproving of homoerotic relationships, as it was of all sexual expression, but showed varying degrees of tolerance, culminating in what John Boswell described as a flowering of a gay sub-culture in the high medieval period.  During the 11th century,  Burchard, the Bishop of Worms in Germany,

“classified homosexuality as a variety of fornication less serious than heterosexual adultery. He assigned penance for homosexual acts only to married men. In civil legislation regulating family life in the diocese of Worms there is no mention of homosexual behaviour”

In 1059, the Lateran synod accepted all of the reforms for the church proposed by St Peter Damian – except for his proposal for harsher penalties against monks engaged in homosexual affairs.

All that changed within a few decades. In 1120, the Church Council of Nablus specified burning at the stake for homosexual acts.  Although this  penalty may not immediately have been applied, other harsh condemnations followed rapidly. In 1212, the death penalty for sodomy was specified in in France. Before long the execution of supposed “sodomites”, often by burning at the stake, but also by other harsh means, had become regular practice in many areas.

Templars

Historical research to date has been patchy, and in many places the records have not survived. Even so, the evidence from the modest research we do have is horrifying.  In the largest scale, and best known, single incident, over 400 hundred Knights Templar were burned in the early 14th century. This is usually discussed in terms of trials for “heresy”, but in fact the charges were of both heresy and sodomy.  (These terms were often associated and confused at the time, but much of the evidence in the Templar trials made it clear that specifically sexual offences were meant).

To modern researchers, it is clear that the trials were deeply flawed, with the procedures seriously stacked against the accused.  In marking the 700th anniversary of the trials in 2007, the Vatican explicitly cleared those killed of the charges of heresy – but said never a word about the charges of sodomy.

Elsewhere, the trials and punishments were of individuals, or of small groups – but with equally flawed judicial procedures. (Typically, the prosecutor was also judge; torture was widely used to extract confessions;  and church and state benefited by sharing the property of those convicted).  These were sometimes under the auspices of the Inquisition, sometimes of the state – but always inspired by church preaching against the “sodomites”.

The severity of the pursuit and punishments varied from place to place.  Venice was one of the harshest, with several hundred executions from 1422, until the persecution finally ended. In Spain, it was calculated that in total there were more burnings for homosexuality than for heresy. Executions also applied in the New World – in both North America (where some of the colonists were accused and convicted) and South (where it was the indigenous locals who suffered for the Spanish prejudices) .  Altogether, it is likely that executions in Southern Europe, either by or with the collaboration of the Church, amounted to several thousand men.

Protestant Europe

After the Reformation, the practice of burning homosexuals spread to Northern Europe and some of the new Protestant territories, where the practice was sometimes use as a pretext to attack Catholic clergy: in Belgium, several Franciscans were burnt for sodomy, as was a Jesuit in Antwerp (in 1601).

The persecution finally began to ease from the late 17th century, when some “softening” became evident by the Inquisition in Spain. Nevertheless, some executions continued throughout the eighteenth century, to as late as 1816 in  England. The statutory provision for the death penalty was not removed in England until 1861.

Obviously, the Catholic Church cannot be held directly responsible for the judicial sentences handed down by secular authorities in Protestant countries.  It can, however, be held responsible for it part in fanning the flames of bigotry and hatred in the early part of the persecution, using the cloak of religion to provide cover for what was in reality based not on Scripture or the teaching of the early Church, but on simple intolerance and greed.

It is important as gay men lesbians and transgendered that we remember the examples of the many who have in earlier times been honoured by the Church as saints or martyrs for the faith.  It is also important that we remember the example of the many thousands who have been martyred by the churches – Catholic and other.

 

Sources:

 

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