The Greatest Pride of All?

Last year, there were an estimated 3 million participants – and more, in an overwhelmingly Catholic city. Figures for this year are believed to similar, and 50 % up on just 5 years ago, and 25 times as many as 2ooo. Sao Paulo Pride has only been going since 1987.

In South America, Pride is not just a fun day out: it’s deeply political. Read the rest of this entry »

Gay Popes, Papal Sodomites

For the month of Gay Pride (in church), it would be great if we could simply celebrate a list of unambiguously gay popes – but we can’t. This is not because they don’t exist (there were undoubtedly several popes whom we know had physical relationships with men), but because of the inadequacies of language, and the weakness of the historical record over something so deeply personal, especially among the clergy. Both of these difficulties are exemplified by Mark Jordan’s use of the phrase, “Papal Sodomites”.  In medieval terms, a “sodomite” was one of utmost abuse, which meant far more than just the modern “homosexual”. It could also include, bestiality, or heresy, or withcraft, and (in England, after the Reformation) “popery”, which is deeply ironic, and hence treason.

So in the years before libel laws and carefully controlled democratic institutions, accusations of “sodomy” were a useful slander for the powerful to throw at their political enemies. Read the rest of this entry »

Gay Popes, Papal Sodomites

For the month of Gay Pride (in church), it would be great if we we could simply celebrate a list of unambiguously gay popes – but we can’t. This is not because they don’t exist (there were undoubtedly several popes whom we know had physical relationships with men), but because of the inadequacies of language, and the weakness of the historical record over something so deeply personal, especially among the clergy. Both of these difficulties are exemplified by Mark Jordan’s use of the phrase, “Papal Sodomites”.  In medieval terms, a “sodomite” was one of utmost abuse, which meant far more than just the modern “homosexual”. It could also include, bestiality, or heresy, or withcraft, and (in England, after the Reformation) “popery”, which is deeply ironic, and hence treason.

So in the years before libel laws and carefully controlled democratic institutions, accusations of “sodomy” were a useful slander for the powerful to throw at their political enemies. Read the rest of this entry »

QTC at Pride

Here I am in front of our Trafalgar Square stall after the London Pride march last week.  (I’m on the left, with a goofy grin and holding a bright yellow copy of Martin Pendergast’s gay catholic reading list).

me at pride stall 2009

And from last year, along with our Joe Stanley, chair of our Soho Masses Pastoral Council.   This was also at our Trafalgar Square stall, after the march- (which is why I was thirsty).

me at pride 2008

Faith at London Pride

4th July – and in London, the parade was for Gay Pride. These pictures, taken by Martin Pendergast, show the participation by some Catholics in the march and Trafalgar Square celebrations, as well as how we marked the occasion at the Soho Mass next day (our Pride Mass is always a highlight of the year.) I still plan to share further words and pictures of the rest of the march and festivities, especially of the many other faith-based participants. These will follow later.

PProudly Gay, Proudly Catholic: London Pride, 2009

Proudly Gay, Proudly Catholic: London Pride, 2009

Our Information Stand at Trafalgar Square

Our Information Stand at Trafalgar Square
 

Pride Mass

Pride Mass

Rainbow Flag for Pride Mass

Rainbow Flag for Pride Mass

A Rainbow Cake After Pride Mass

A Rainbow Cake After Pride Mass

 

“Coming Out” as Wrestling with the Divine

At this time of Pride, marking the 40th anniversary of Stonewall, I wanted to post something on the important legacy of visibility and coming out.

After mulling over some thoughts on what to say, I picked up Richard Cleaver’s “Know My Name” for re-reading, and was delighted by the synchronicity of finding that his Chapter 2, “Knowing and Naming”, deals with exactly this subject.  So instead of rehashing or expanding the ideas I presented in my opening post 6 months ago (“Welcome:  Come in, and Come out”), I thought I would share with you some of Cleaver’s insights.

First, Cleaver points out that in addition to the modern association of “coming out” with escaping the closet, there are two other important contexts. It can also call to mind the Exodus story of coming out of the land of Egypt, of escaping slavery and oppression; and it was used before Stonewall to mimic the English debutante ritual of “coming out” into society, of achieving the first recognition as an adult in polite society .  For us then, coming out is both a liberation from oppression and an acceptance and a welcome into a new society.  He then continues by arguing that coming out in the modern sense is an essential first step in hearing the Gospel message of liberation .

Read the rest of this entry »

Most Holy Redeemer Vandalised

Breaking News

In an apparent reaction to the passing of California’s Proposition 8, and as part of ongoing protests and a backlash against Mormon and Catholic churches as having supported the proposition, vandals have desecrated the Catholic Church of the Most Holy Redeemer in San Francisco’s Castro.

The irony is that this church has long been a beacon for gay pride, with a world wide reputation for its outstanding LGBT ministry.

More from  the San Francisco Chronicle.